Emergence 2018 Event: 19 October 2018 Salt Lake City, Utah

Emergence 2018 – with Byron Katie

Question your limiting beliefs and discover your innate wisdom. Join Byron Katie for her keynote address on opening night of the Emergence 2018 conference.

Katie’s method of self-inquiry, known as The Work, has helped millions of people across the world to find a way out of depression, stress, anger, and confusion. As Katie guides you through her process, you may find that your stressful beliefs—about life, other people, or yourself—radically shift and your life is changed forever.

Unlimited access to audio and video recordings of all keynote speakers and workshop sessions will be available to ticket holders after the event. The full conference is 19–21 October 2018.

19 October 2018 8-9:30 p.m.

For contact information about this event email info@Emergence2018.org

 

Event: Conversations with Byron Katie—17 September 2018—Online webcast

This event with Byron Katie will last about one hour and can be viewed with the link below.

To view the webcast online visit, livewithbyronkatie.com.

If you have questions you would like to submit, please use the link below.

Click here to submit your questions.

For more information about The Work and upcoming events, visit thework.com

We live in difficult times, leaving far too many of us suffering from anxiety and depression, fear and anger. In her new and most anticipated work since Loving What Is, beloved spiritual teacher Byron Katie provides a much-needed beacon of light, and a source of hope and joy.

In A Mind At Home With Itself, Byron Katie illuminates one of the most profound ancient Buddhist texts, The Diamond Sutra (newly translated in these pages by Stephen Mitchell) to reveal the nature of the mind and to liberate us from painful thoughts, using her revolutionary system of self-inquiry called “The Work.”

Alanis Morissette and Byron Katie discuss discovering freedom through inquiry

Join me as Alanis Morissette and I discuss discovering freedom through inquiry—freedom from the ego, from pain, from our stories.

(To listen, click here or the image above.)

 

Free worksheet mentioned in the podcast by Byron Katie

For upcoming event information, click here.

In the midst of a normal life, Katie became increasingly depressed, and over a ten-year period sank further into rage, despair, and thoughts of suicide. Then one morning, she woke up in a state of absolute joy, filled with the realization of how her own suffering had ended. The freedom of that realization has never left her, and now in Loving What Is you can discover the same freedom through The Work.

 

 

Byron Katie Quote

“Dear bk, My favorite quote of yours is one I never see anywhere — it’s one you say at the end of the School: ‘move without resistance toward the kindest thought involved with action.’ I’ve made it my mantra for living! Life without stressful thoughts: so simple — so beautiful. — PW

 

For more information about upcoming events, visit thework.com

For a copy of Byron Katie and Stephen Mitchell’s newest book A Mind at Home with Itself, click here.

 

 

Event: 6 September 2018 LIVE at Home with Byron Katie

Join Byron Katie for two hours of inquiry using The Work, four simple questions that bring relief from confusion and suffering. Experience the clarity of understanding thoughts that have been troubling you for years. Leave this workshop with everything you need to do The Work on your own.

 

You can also join this event live on The Work of Byron Katie Facebook page.

 

For more information, visit thework.com

Event: 26 August 2018 Spirit Rock Meditation Center

A Benefit for the Spirit Rock Scholarship Fund and the School for The Work Scholarship Fund

Join Byron Katie in a workshop designed to take you on a journey of radical self-discovery. With her humor and lovingly incisive clarity, she will help you understand the cause of your suffering and how to end it. People who spend time with Katie find again and again that their assumptions and unquestioned judgments—about the world, other people, and themselves—shift or vanish. We invite everyone with an open mind and a desire for a happy and healthy life to take this opportunity to join Byron Katie at this event.

 

For More information visit, thework.com

How to See People for Who They Really Are

 

Also available on iTunes, here.

 

Susan Piver of the Daily Dharma Gathering interviews Byron Katie and Stephen Mitchell. “As a busy Buddhist, it’s a delight to feel the cohesion between my Buddhist studies and The Work,” Susan says. “It feels like there’s no difference. And The Work is meditation that you can do off the cushion.”
“Yes,” Katie says, “it’s a practice that takes stillness, and we don’t have to leave meditation just because we’re walking and talking, going to work, and taking care of our children. And we don’t need that cushion once inquiry is alive in us. It’s an unceasing meditation to live in these questions. As an example, if I meet someone and hold a grudge against them, it’s what I’m believing onto them that creates that grudge. It’s like I’m slapping post-its on them as if my judgments are that person. So I’m not talking to that person, but rather to the identity that I believe them to be. So it’s no wonder we’re confused in our relationships. It’s my responsibility to meditate on and to question what I’m believing about you, so that I can see you and know you. Believing onto you doesn’t show me you. When I take my story off someone by questioning what I believe about them, I begin to experience compassion and love.”
Later they discuss Katie and Stephen’s new book, A Mind at Home with Itselfwhich is based on the Diamond Sutra. “A mind at home with itself is the end of war in your world,” Katie says.
“The Diamond Sutra is a text that centers on the issue of generosity,” Stephen says. “The main point is that the more you understand the unreality of the self, and see that there’s no difference between self and other, the more you naturally live a life of unfettered generosity. It came to me that this sutra would be an excellent framework for Katie to talk about her experience, because it’s so much in harmony with the spirit of The Work.”
“As Stephen read to me his translation of the sutra,” Katie says, “I wept with joy. I felt that any word I added to it would take away from its clarity. But Stephen encouraged me to speak out of my own experience, so I followed the simple directions, and we ended up with this book. We hope you find it helpfully alarming!”
The clearer the mind, the clearer the choices. —Byron Katie
For more information, free resources and a list of upcoming events visit thework.com.

How to be Safe in the Abyss—The Work of Byron Katie

To listen on iTunes, click here.

 

 

Iñaki describes to Byron Katie how he becomes fearful when he understands that thoughts create his world.

“Walking down the street,” Iñaki says, “I understood that my thoughts create the world I experience. Then it felt like an abyss was opening around me, like a pool of nothingness. With this feeling came fear. Fear of nothingness, of dissolution, of disconnection, fear of being alone in a cold and unfriendly universe, like an astronaut cut off from his spacecraft and the world, lost in the nowhere.”

“The moment you fear what you perceive as the abyss,” Katie says, “you frighten yourself back into this false world that you see as safe. So there’s nothing enlightened about it; it’s just one more terrifying thought. No different. But it’s enough to keep the ego strong and identified. So let’s prepare for that unfriendly universe. Get still, and imagine yourself as that astronaut. There’s no way back, no help. You’re drifting away. You’re never going to see another human being or get help. And you’re not even going to die. This is forever. What do you want in that moment?”

“I want to feel safe.” Iñaki says.

“Other than what you’re thinking and believing, are you safe?” Katie says.

“Yes,” Iñaki says, laughing in recognition.

“Someone said, ‘Imagination is everything.’ Your imagination frightened you, not the abyss. The abyss has a terrible reputation. It’s so beautiful. And what I love about the abyss is that it’s an opportunity to do The Work. What is truer: “I shouldn’t trust this?” or “I shouldn’t trust my thoughts about this?” Whenever we believe our thoughts, we’re out there in the abyss. ‘The abyss is cold, terrifying, empty, forever, disconnected.’ One turnaround is: your thoughts are cold and terrifying; they would keep you from such a beautiful experience. The next time you’re in the abyss and frightened, capture what you are thinking and question it. After questioning it, the abyss just becomes another place to be still. All you’re going to discover when you’re alone is yourself. With people—without people—fear is fear. You know how to question it. And people, like the abyss, are your imagination. Just like the abyss, we are not who you believe us to be.”

The abyss is the same as the earth. Pure imagination. —Byron Katie

 

For more information, free recources and a list of upcoming events visit thework.com

To read Byron Katie’s newest book written with Stephen Mitchell visit A Mind at Home with Itself

 

Podcast: Is it Crazy to be Fearful?

To listen on iTunes, click here.

Aaron Alexander of Align Podcast spends an hour with Byron Katie. As a result of feeling unsafe, insecure, and alone, Aaron has developed a strong social media presence to create support, network, and community for these issues.
“When people are struggling,” Katie says, “inquiry is a place they can turn to. The Work is meditation. It’s a different way of getting still. In this stillness, we invite in the teacher that really matters. We invite what’s shown to us in the silence.”
Aaron asks, “How important is language in the moment? It feels to me like we create our world around our language, and with every word you’d say, ‘It’s like we’re casting a spell on those around us.'”
“We are,” Katie says. “What I’m thinking and believing is the spell that I’m casting on my life. And that spills over to other people. Is what I’m believing kind? If it’s kind, it’s wise. To live out of a kind mind is an amazing gift. We all have the power to sit in the question ‘Is it true?’ and discover that wisdom.
“Enlightenment is a trip I invite people not to miss. And I can’t claim enlightenment. What I received was a gift that I can’t take credit for. I’m just grateful that I’m out of that awful suffering, and that I can pass on–to anyone who’s open to it–a way out of depression, loneliness, isolation, addictions, and low self-esteem. There is a way out.”
Aaron asks about Katie’s January 2014 close call with death.
“Oh yes, my vital organs were shutting down,” Katie says. “I was dying, and the doctors couldn’t do anything about it. This is all detailed inA Mind at Home with Itself. Long story short, I never saw a problem. I love life. I don’t want to waste one moment of that life worrying about the future.”
“Are there any fear-based patterns that you still replay?” Aaron asks.
“I still experience images and words; there’s just no attachment to them. They’re fantasy. It’s like going to a movie, but you know it’s a movie. If I can shift to a kinder state of mind, then anyone can. I wouldn’t want anyone to live in a state of mind as crazy as mine was. Inquiry has allowed me to open my arms to what is.”
“In what direction do I point people to find out more?” asks Aaron.
“Tothework.com,” Katie says. “And for people interested in non-duality, I have a No-Body Intensive. And I invite everyone to the School for The Work. It’s a radical nine days of inquiry.”
In stillness or meditation, we invite in the teacher that really matters. —Byron Katie
For more information, visit thework.com

Video: How to Confront Your Fears through Meditation

Byron Katie takes a moment to explain what The Work is for.

“Inquiry is for things that go bump in the night,” Katie explains. “It allows us to deal with the thoughts that move you from your true nature. Inquiry is a way to identify these thoughts and put them on paper. To bring them from your mind into this world we’re identified with. And once they’re on paper, to question them. It’s so simple, that anyone with an open mind can do it. It’s meditation. It takes stillness.

“I try to get it down on paper just the way it’s dictated by my mind. Then I really slow the question down, because I really want to know if it’s true. So I meditate on ‘Is it true?’ And I’m not going to manipulate the answer. That’s not meditation. I’m going to wait, get still, and see what arises to meet the question. You don’t ever have to guess in The Work. Get still. Ask. It’s given. It will enlighten you to what is true about what you are believing.”

Inquiry is for things that go bump in the night. Everything else is working for you. —Byron Katie

 

How to Have a Clear Mind and Healthy Body

 

Also available on iTunes, here.

 

 

Marcela from Canada asks Byron Katie, “If a body is just a projection of mind, do we still need to take care of it?”

“Absolutely,” Katie says. “Cause and effect. If I don’t eat, the body dies. That is the apparent material world. Then there’s another world. There’s a world the enlightened mind sees. Not in time, but now, as we sit in the answers that these questions can take us to.

“It’s impossible to be a physical body because the body is a projection of your mind. So take care of the mind when you’re stressed out, and clarity and love will take care of your projected body.

“Any time you feel stress, this unnatural feeling of being out of harmony, look to what you’re thinking and believing in the moment, and clear it up with The Work. Inquiry is like a constant state of meditation that happens without my help. I’m just letting it run.

“Now, get really still, and notice the times when you don’t take care of the body. Look to see the story running in your mind just before you binged, had the cigarette or drug, or got angry. The trigger is hidden in the time just prior to that. Whether something is good for me or not, if I feel guilt, I take care of it. I don’t do The Work on the thing I ate or did, I go back and do The Work on mother, father, sister, brother, roommate, or whoever the story is about.”

“Actually, I was the opposite,” Marcela says. “I was always exercising, taking vitamins, and trying to do what the latest study told me to do.”

“Yes, rather than the chocolate cake, that’s your addiction.”

“I notice that I did it for fear of being sick. It wasn’t because it was what I really wanted to do; it was done in fear of the future if I did not take care of my body.”

“Yes. It’s the ego’s fear of death,” Katie says. “The ego tells you: ‘You have to take care of this body; you can’t be too careful. Take those vitamins, run, eat right.’ Without the ego identified as the body, this material object, then who am I? As an ego, who am I?”

“After doing The Work, I actually started to notice myself stressing about these things,” Marcela says.

“Health is about right here, right now, isn’t it?” Katie says. “People may be telling me I’m sick and dying, and I could be in pain, but I’m fine in my mind. 100%. I am healthy because I’m not at war with what I’m witnessing. I’m not at war with death. I’m not at war with life. I’m well.”

It’s a beautiful thing to love what we think in this moment. —Byron Katie

thework.com

Forgiveness is not what you think

Also available on iTunes, here.

 

Byron Katie and Armin Rott of Germany talk about how forgiveness really happens through the meditative process of The Work. This interview was part of the first German online Forgiveness Conference in 2017.

“Forgiveness,” Katie says, “is knowing that what I believed happened, didn’t necessarily happen. I can put all of these negative thoughts on you like post-its. These are my thoughts; they’re not you. And I’m blaming you for being the person I believe you to be. I’ve made you an enemy.

“I’m the one doing that to you; you’re never doing it to me. That’s forgiveness. Seeing that what I thought happened, didn’t.

“Now I can put these judgments on a Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet and question them. With this inquiry we can find ourselves not only in a state of forgiveness, but in a state of connectedness with the person we were judging.

“You didn’t change. I questioned what I believed about you, and forgiveness happened. No one can separate me from another human being; I’m the only one who can do that. If I’m not connected, that’s on me. I look to what I’m thinking and believing.

“And if I’ve done anything out of that unkind, believing mind, I admit it, apologize, and make it right when I can, but only when I’m sincere about it. And this can be very humbling. It’s quite a turnaround for the ego.”

“The hardest part,”Armin says, “is giving up the perceived need to be right, to attack, to judge, and to not feel how much it hurts.”

“If I want to be right,” Katie says, “that’s my first clue that it’s time for me to identify what I’m thinking and believing about this other human being, write the judgments and assumptions down, question them, and turn them around, so that I can see that human being for who they really are. If I have an enemy, that’s on me, not them. So we’re talking about complete and total forgiveness.

“It can take time,”Armin says, “to do this process of forgiveness through The Work. But it can be completed.”

“Yes,” says Katie. “When we ask ‘Is it true?’ we have to get still and meditate on that question to see what meets it. And what meets it is big. It will shift you right out of your identity. What meets the question is your own wisdom.”

“Oh my God!” Armin says, with tears in his eyes. “Okay, I think I haven’t understood The Work. Oh my God! This is deep! What a relief! Thank you, Katie. Then, in that stillness, you have access to what is true. Oh! Thank you. And now I realize that there is no way to forgive unless you have access to that.”

“It’s the beginning of the end of the war in you,” Katie says. “Just now. It’s a gift, this recognition. And your tears are only the physical evidence of the recognition, this flower opening and petals falling. It’s beautiful.

Armin sits in silence, then gently begins to laugh. “Thank you…wow!” he says, wiping away a tear. “Can I ask one more question? What happened on the floor when the cockroach crawled over your foot?”

“I saw how the entire world was created,” Katie says. “The world is nothing until it’s named. And it’s still nothing until you believe that name. The Work was born on that floor. I saw that nothing was true. How do you react, what happens when you believe that thought? I saw that the entire world was created in that moment. And who would I be without the thought is me prior to believing the thought. And the opposites are as true or truer. So it’s all left up to the mind to determine.

“Many people have had experiences of realization. The difference for me is that The Work was given to me at the same time, so that the realization could be maintained and nurtured. The inquiry is alive in me. It’s alive! Everything just naturally ends in a question mark. It’s the questioning mind. For people who invite this into their mediation practice, eventually it becomes a part of their mind as well. It’s a practice until finally it takes hold of us. But that takes a very open mind. It takes stillness. It’s not about emptying the mind; it’s about surrendering to the mind, and just offering ‘Is it true?’ to the mind.”

“I’d say that’s discipline in the best sense,” Armin says.

The enlightened mind has nothing to forgive. — Byron Katie

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