Video: I’m Afraid of Trump

A woman suffering from a deep-seated fear of Donald Trump questions her many thoughts about him. “He will create concentration camps,” she has written on her Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet, “cause a nuclear war, and ruin the environment. I want him to not be president, to disappear, or at least to get a better, kinder set of cabinet members. He should step aside and offer the space to Hillary Clinton or another Republican candidate. Trump shouldn’t say things that are racist, sexist, able-ist, homophobic, and xenophobic.”

Slowly, with Katie’s help, she questions these terrifying thoughts, sometimes with the help of the audience, and the heaviness of the thoughts begins to dissolve. After completing the inquiry, she has a moment of insight, as she realizes that it is the thoughts that create her fear, not Trump. She proceeds to tear up her Worksheet in a flourish of delight, to cheers from the audience. Katie turns to her with a smile and says, “You’ve just made America great again!”

Website: http://www.thework.com

Video: Donald Trump Frightens Me

Dixie is frightened by Donald Trump because she’s afraid he will dismantle Obamacare and Social Security, ruin our economy, deport her immigrant neighbors, undermine the effort to combat global warming, abolish women’s reproductive rights, put us at risk of nuclear war, risk planetary destruction, and take away her hope for our country.

As Byron Katie helps her question her fears, Dixie begins to understand how it’s the images in her mind that frighten her, not Donald Trump. “When we believe our thoughts,” Katie says, “we’re hypnotized. This very moment is the only opportunity we have to make real change. The gift of life goes on no matter what you’re thinking and believing. Reality is always kinder than the story we’re believing about it.”

Follow-up message from Dixie: “For the first time since November 8th, I am meeting the new morning on its own terms. And as a result, in this moment, all is well in “my kitchen.'”

Website: http://www.thework.com

Shootings in Paris

The email below was submitted from the United Kingdom for a Conversation with Byron Katie webcast in regards to the events in Paris, France on 7 January 2015.

 

Q: How should the world react to the shootings in Paris this week?

Katie: Exactly the way they reacted. How did you react to the shootings in Paris?

Notice what you were thinking and believing. Were you able to stop what you were thinking, saying, doing, believing, in the moment you experienced it happening?

 

Q: How can we stop the response to it just creating more hate?

Katie: “The response is creating more hate”—is it true? Etc. Or is it not wiser that you look at your own responses, any response of hate, fear, etc. within you?

 


Q: Can religious extremists ever live peacefully side by side?

Katie: Is there someone in your life that you can’t live side by side with in total peace? I suggest that you begin there, dearest. If you can’t do it, why would you think that others can? Peace really is up to you. When do you begin? Always now.

 

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Taking Action in a Perfect World

The world is perfect. As you question your mind, this becomes more and more obvious. Mind changes, and as a result, the world changes. A clear mind heals everything that needs to be healed. It can never be fooled into believing that there is one speck out of order.

But some people take the insight that the world is perfect and make it into a concept, and then they conclude that there’s no need to get involved in politics or social action. That’s separation. If someone came to you and said, “I’m suffering. Please help me,” would you answer, “You’re perfect just the way you are,” and turn away? Our heart naturally responds to people and animals in need.

Realization has no value until it’s lived. I would travel to the ends of the earth for the sake of one person who is suffering. The desperate, the hopeless, are unenlightened cells of my own body. It’s my own body I’m talking about—the body of the world is my body. Would I let myself drown in water that doesn’t exist? Would I let myself die in an imagined torture chamber? My God, I think, there’s someone out there who really believes there’s a problem. I remember when I used to think there was a problem. How can I say no when that person asks for help? That would be saying no to myself. So I say yes and I go, if I can. It’s a privilege. It’s more than that: it’s self-love.

People are perfect just the way they are, however deeply they’re suffering, but they don’t realize that yet. So when I meet someone who’s suffering, I don’t say, “Oh, there’s no problem, everything is perfect.” Though I can see that there’s never a problem, and I’m available to help him see that, telling him what I see would be unkind. That part of my body is suffering, everything is not perfect for him, because he believes it’s not. I, too, have been trapped in the torture chamber of the mind. I hear what he thinks he needs, I hear his sadness or despair, and I’m available. That’s full-blown activism. In the presence of someone who doesn’t see a problem, the problem falls away—which shows you that there isn’t a problem.

People ask me, “How can you listen to all these problems, day after day, year after year? Doesn’t it drain your energy?” Well, it doesn’t. I’ve questioned my stressful thoughts, and I’ve seen that every single one of them is untrue. Every thought that used to look like a poisonous snake is actually a rope. I could stand over that rope for a thousand years, and never be frightened of it again. I see clearly what some people don’t yet see for themselves. Everyone in the world might come upon that rope and run screaming the other way, and I wouldn’t be afraid for them, feel sorry for them, or worry about them at all, because I realize that they’re not in danger, they’re absolutely not in harm’s way. As they cry snake, I see only rope.

If you have a problem with people or with the state of the world, I invite you to put your stressful thoughts on paper and question them, and to do it for the love of truth, not in order to save the world. Turn it around: save your own world. Isn’t that why you want to save the world in the first place? So that you can be happy? Well, skip the middleman, and be happy from here! You’re it. You’re the one. In this turnaround you remain active, but there’s no fear in it, no internal war. So it ceases to be war trying to teach peace. War can’t teach peace. Only peace can.

From A Thousand Names for Joy: Living in Harmony with the Way Things Are

Activism and The Work

Here’s an excerpt from chapter 29 of my new book A Thousand Names for Joy: Living in Harmony with the Way Things Are:

If you have a problem with people or with the state of the world, I invite you to put your stressful thoughts on paper and question them, and to do it for the love of truth, not in order to save the world. Turn it around: save your own world. Isn’t that why you want to save the world in the first place? So that you can be happy? Well, skip the middleman, and be happy from here! You’re it. You’re the one. In this turnaround you remain active, but there’s no fear in it, no internal war. So it ceases to be war trying to teach peace. War can’t teach peace. Only peace can.

I don’t try to change the world—not ever. The world changes by itself, and I’m a part of that change. I’m absolutely, totally, a lover of what is. When people ask me for help, I say yes. We inquire, and they begin to end their suffering, and in that they begin to end the suffering of the world.

I stand in my own truth and don’t presume to know what’s best for the planet. Knowing that the world is perfect doesn’t mean that you withdraw or stop doing what you know is right for you to do. If, for example, you’re concerned about the environment, please give us all the facts. Do a whole study of it, go to graduate school if you have to, help us out here. And if you talk to us clearly, without an agenda or any investment in the results, we can hear you, because you’re on our level. You’re not talking to us from a superior, I-know position. If you know that we’re all equal, that we’re all doing the best we can, you can be the most powerful activist on the planet.

Love is the power. I know only one way to be an activist who can really penetrate the human race, and that is to give the facts, to tell your experience honestly, and to love without condition. You can’t convince the world of anything, even if it’s for the world’s own good, because eventually your righteousness will be seen through, and then you’re on a stage debating a corporate polluter, and you start pointing your finger in outrage. That’s what you’ve been hiding when you believe “I know what’s best for the planet.”

When you attack a corporate official for destroying the atmosphere, however valid your information, do you think that he’ll be open to what you’re saying? You’re threatening him with your attitude, and the facts can get lost, because you’re coming from fear and righteous anger. All he’ll hear is that you think he’s doing it wrong, it’s his fault, and he’ll go into denial and resistance. But if you speak to him without stress, in total confidence that everything is just the way it should be in this very moment, you’re able to express yourself kindly, effectively, and with no fear about the future.

By the way, the Dutch version of the book is called Katie’s Tao.

Anxiety – The Beginning of Wisdom

An uncomfortable feeling is not an enemy.

It’s a gift that says, “Get honest; inquire.”

We reach out for alcohol, or television, or credit cards, so we can focus out there and not have to look at the feeling. And that’s as it should be, because in our innocence we haven’t known how.

So now what we can do is reach out for a paper and a pencil, write the thought down, and investigate.