How to find peace after another school shooting

Also available on iTunes, here.

Jo-Jo from Hercules California asks, “What if the Santa Barbara shooter had had the chance to do inquiry, to challenge the thoughts that led him to kill people? Perhaps he wouldn’t have done what he did.”

“If I have no cause to kill. why would I kill?” Katie says. “Every time we do The Work and question the thoughts that cause anger and separation, we lose the ability to do harm, because we are taking care of original cause, which is the mind and what it’s believing.”

“Is it possible to do The Work as a community for Elliot and for kids who are not able to discover the questioning of their minds, so maybe they won’t harm people?” Jo Jo asks.

“If that shooting is of concern to me,” says Katie, “then I’m going to do The Work on that shooter. I’m going to question every judgment I have about that shooter from the moment I first heard about him. I’ll put those judgments, what I’m thinking and believing, onto the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. And then I’m going to give myself what I want the community to have. And if I don’t find peace with it, I’m going to do another Worksheet. I’m going to call a Certified Facilitator of The Work, I’m going to call the Do The Work Helpline. I’m going to go to the School for The Work. I’m going to go to thework.com and follow the simple directions. I’m going to give myself everything I want the community to have. Then I’ll call the community together and invite them to do The Work. Some of them will come, some of them won’t, but you’re serving the community just through the invitation.”

“Is it possible to do The Work for Elliot and other mass murderers, even though they’re gone?” Jo Jo asks.

“To do The Work on him is to shift that,” Katie says. “Do The Work as him. Put yourself in the place of someone who is so bitter, so angry at women, and what he might have been thinking and believing in order to do such thing. You’ll recognize thoughts there, whether they were his or not; you’ll be sitting inside the mind of a murderer. That’s in all of us.

“When you do The Work on him, you’ll find the murderer in you, and when you do The Work as him, sitting in that car just before he went in to do the deed. By doing that you’re going to clean out everything you don’t want in this world. Once that’s cleared out, there will never be a mass murder that will upset you again. When you’re really clear, he could be aiming at you or at your nieces and nephews, and you will not be alarmed. You will be of service instead. There’s nothing more powerful than peace. And it’s so exciting.”

In the clarity of awareness, you’re unlimited. —Byron Katie

 

thework.com

Discussion of “A Mind at Home with Itself” with Byron Katie, Stephen Mitchell, and John Tarrant

Also available on iTunes, click here to listen.

In this fascinating discussion between Byron Katie, John Tarrant, and Stephen Mitchell, the three take a deep dive into similarities between The Work and Buddhism, and how these were woven into “A Mind at Home with Itself.”

John begins, “In Katie and Stephen’s new book, Stephen translates and makes very accessible one of the great wisdom texts, the Diamond Sutra, while Katie responds to this text from her inner quiet. Deconstructing your thought forms and what mind is believing is a practice common to Zen Buddhism and The Work, with its four questions and the turnarounds.”

“I loved interacting with the Diamond Sutra,” Katie says. “Stephen would read me a chapter and then ask me to respond. After hearing it, I always felt that I wouldn’t add anything or subtract anything. Stephen encouraged me to respond by asking me questions. It was such a beautiful experience.”

Stephen explains, “My intent was to make the Diamond Sutra text transparent so that the Buddha mind could shine through; accessible, here and now, and radiant. My intent was also to bring Zen and The Work together, because we’ve found that each practice enhances the other. For people doing Dharma practice to learn to question specific thoughts that are causing impediments is of enormous benefit, and likewise, meditation practice, deepening one’s stillness and ability to focus, has great benefit for people practicing The Work.”

“Yes,” says John, “and there are similarities between the Dharma and The Work as transformational practices. One is the understanding that reality is more profound and beautiful than my maps or thoughts about reality.”

“Inquiry is a way to test that over and over and over,” Katie says. “Through the four questions and the turnarounds, we begin to wake up to the mind as creator of all. That all of the apparent outside really is inner.”

John quotes an ancient Chinese Zen master: “‘Zen directly points to the human mind without reference to words or scriptures.’ And of course, scriptures like the Diamond Sutra say that. So inquiry into the nature of mind becomes a practice. There’s really nothing wrong with having a thought, but you can be curious as to whether it’s true or not. So there’s a question mark that happens with it. You’re not trying to get rid of it or contradict it; you’re just wondering about it.”

“Yes,” Katie says, “there’s an excitement about it when each thought ends in a question mark. It’s ‘Is it true?’ without experiencing the actual words. It’s that open, brilliant, fearless state of mind where you come to understand and appreciate the true nature of everything.”

“In a way, that’s a practice,” John says, “because as soon as I start believing something, I can be pretty sure that it isn’t true, because our thoughts are hypotheses about reality. Mainly we think we are our thoughts in a naive sense. We think the world we’ve made of our thoughts is something we’re compelled to live in.”

Any reaction I experience is an invitation to inquiry — an invitation to experience the questioning of thought. — Byron Katie

John Tarrant, Roshi, teaches and writes about the transformation of consciousness through meditation on Zen koans (existential questions than can’t be answered through rational thinking).

Byron Katie shows us how to question the thinking that causes all the suffering, revealing the peace and wisdom within every one of us.

Stephen Mitchell’s many books include the bestselling “Tao Te Ching,” “The Selected Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke,” “Gilgamesh,” “The Gospel According to Jesus,” “The Book of Job,” “The Second Book of the Tao,” “The Iliad,” “The Odyssey,” and “Beowulf.

Event: July 2018 School for The Work, 10-19 July 2018

Location: Ojai, Ca

Dates: 10-19 July 2018

The curriculum at the School is a living, evolving process, changing with the needs of the participants and on the basis of past students’ experiences. The exercises and activities are designed to mirror the transformation Katie herself went through after she woke up to reality in 1986. You will work on issues such as sex, fear, body image, addiction, money, and relationships of every kind.

The School for The Work is an immersion experience—an immersion in freedom. Each day during the School you may find yourself feeling freer and happier than the day before. Old habits may fall away like outworn clothes. You may find yourself eager to get up in the morning so that you won’t miss a moment of this unfolding adventure.

 

The early-bird registration discount for first-time participants is $300. This discount expires Monday, 11 June 2018 at 11:59 p.m. PST.

 

Learn more about the School for The Work by clicking here.

For more information, please contact our registration team at +1 805.444.5799 ext. 1, or registration@thework.com.

How to Step Out of the Dream and Into Your Life

To listen on iTunes, click here.

 

Tori from France says, “I’m upset because I’m too young to have children” and “I want to accept what’s going on.”

She recalls a moment when she was younger, sitting alone in her studio. This is the situation she will meditate on as she questions her thoughts.

“So, “You want to accept what is going on”—is it true?” asks Katie. “Or do you want to argue with reality? Other than what you’re thinking and believing, there’s nothing to accept. There’s just the grace of reality. You have everything you need. And how do you react when you believe the thought ‘I want to accept what is going on,’ and you really don’t accept it?”

“I feel incapable,” says Tori.

“Yes, because you see images of past and future, so you’re sitting there, lost in the dream,” Katie says. “You’re believing everything you think about those images. The story you place on those images in your head costs you your life. Who would you be without the thought? You would be what is going on. Chair, ceiling, walls…reality. Now can you find an opposite of this thought?”

“I don’t want to accept what is going on,” Tori says. “Do I have a choice to accept or not accept?”

“Not as long as you’re believing your thoughts,” Katie says. “You can trust reality. It’s not going to shift or move for you. Once you know the nature of the universe, that it’s kind, giving, and one hundred percent for you, in service to you–once you understand that, there’s no fear of just noticing what’s going on. The mind is like a child that hasn’t found its way home yet. It doesn’t know how to be or rest in itself. It doesn’t know how to question itself, so there’s chaos. And the feelings that come with that can be terrifying. I invite you to complete a Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet, question your thoughts, and wake yourself from the dream.”

The story you place on the images in your head costs you your life. — Byron Katie

 

For more information, visit, thework.com

Podcast: How to Find a Home in Your Peace of Mind

Also available on iTunes, listen here.

 

 

Byron Katie does The Work via Skype with a woman from Virginia who struggles with her belief that “God should help me pay the rent.”
“Notice what happens when you believe this thought,” Katie says.
“I get very angry,” says the woman, “and I wonder what I did wrong. Am I being punished?”

Katie says, “If I believed that thought, I would become a beggar. I’d become guilty. I can see how I would put it all on God, telling God what to do, what’s best, and dictating where God’s money should go. I’d be out of my business and into God’s bank account. So, right here, right now, who are you without the thought?”

“That’s a scary one,” says the woman.

“It is, but only if you put a future onto it,” Katie says. “So just right here, right now: who would you be if you weren’t that dictator?”

After meditating on the question, the woman says, “I would be somebody who likes God. I’d be at peace. I would not be afraid to look at more opportunities and find more ways to pay the rent.”

“Notice that you’re sitting with a roof over your head,” Katie says. “You don’t look too hot or too cold. Right here right now. This is where the gift is. We forget about the grace of what’s given now if we’re busy projecting onto the future. So now imagine yourself at a homeless shelter. Other than what you are thinking and believing, are you okay? The worst that can happen is what you’re thinking and believing, with or without your rent paid.”

“Yes!” the woman says. “Other than what I’m thinking and believing, I’m okay.”

“I’d love that you understand this beyond all apparent conditions in your mind,” Katie says. “It takes sitting in the silence and listening. Notice how the false images of a future will come like a tidal wave to wipe away your peace. You understand where that peace is. You understand how to find it.”

Being homeless is when I’m not present with myself.—Byron Katie

 

For more information about The Work, visit thework.com.

Podcast: How Do Your Beliefs Shape Your World?

To listen on iTumes, click here.

 

A woman from Denmark asks, “How do you know when it’s time to make changes? You get to love everything as it is, but still, Katie, you make changes, for instance, you left Paul, your ex-husband. So I’m confused, because I am happy and content, but I still feel a need to change my life. I can always find a way to love what is, but then am I not being true to myself?”

Byron Katie answers, “I didn’t change my life; I lived a yes to my own heart’s desire. Even though I was married to Paul, I found a deeper marriage: to my inner voice. So I became only answerable to that. The only thing that could stop me from living out of that was fear. Love is a fearless state of mind. I had no other reason except that yes to leave Paul. I began to travel and was very rarely home. That was too much for him. He naturally began to make another life for himself, and I’m grateful for that. So the change came from inside. If you’re afraid to make a change, write your fearful thoughts on a Worksheet and set yourself free to make change, or not.

“There are no do’s or don’ts. Inquiry is about the end of suffering. It’s freedom to ask anything of anyone, and then trust that they’ll say yes or no. Freedom doesn’t look the way we think. It’s just a natural flow of words, and humor, and life. I know there is this precious place of no past and no future. The Work can open us to that. This precious place is always there. It’s always to be trusted, unfailingly.”

As the mind changes, life changes. —Byron Katie

Podcast: Do You Really Need a Partner to be Happy?

 

Also available in iTune, Click here to listen.

A young woman does The Work at the New Year’s Mental Cleanse in Los Angeles. She is stuck on the belief “I need a partner to be happy.” With Byron Katie’s help, she questions this belief and the many thoughts and images of past and future that support it. “How do you react when you believe the thought ‘I need a partner’ and you’re around men?” Katie asks. “There’s a desperation,” the woman says, “and I can’t see people in the moment. I concoct stories about attractive men.” A bit later Katie says, “Turn it around. ‘I don’t need a partner.’ Examples?” “I don’t need a partner, so I can learn to be with my thoughts in peace,” says the woman. “So I can do puzzles by myself.” An audience member says, “They may not like cats.” “That’s a huge one for me,” the woman laughs. “You can grow with or without someone,” Katie adds, “and when you’re comfortable in yourself, the partner will come, or not. Be the person you love living with the most. For me it’s the joy of being with Stephen or without Stephen. One is equally as divine as the other. You are the beloved. You’re the one you want. You’re the one you need. You’re the one who is always there for you.” When you’re not in touch with yourself, it’s a lonely world, with or without a partner.

Byron Katie Website: http://www.thework.com

Webcasts: http://www.livewithbyronkatie.com

Subscribe to YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/theworkofbk

Podcast: Filling in a Worksheet as a Meditation

Also available on iTunes, click here to listen.

 

Byron Katie guides you through meditation on the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. First she helps you recall a specific situation when you were upset with someone.

“Find a situation when you were frustrated, angry, or hurt with someone. Get in touch with the emotion and name it. Then get in touch with why you were upset with this person.

Identify what you were thinking and believing in that situation. Anchor in that situation, in that moment in time, and ask the next question on your Worksheet.

Continue to collect your thoughts from that moment. What were you thinking about that person?”

“This Work takes stillness. We are meditating on a moment in time.” —Byron Katie

 

For more information, visit thework.com

Podcast: How to meet the ego with understanding

Also available on iTunes, listen here.

 

Byron Katie talks with a woman from Serbia who asks, “Do we all have ego?”

“What is an ego to you?” Katie says. “To me, the I that believes is the ego: the you that you believe to be you, the one you think is the thinker, the false self.”

“Sometimes ego seems useful and constructive,” says the woman, “but sometimes it’s not useful. I don’t know how to question that part of me. How can I be at peace with that part of me?”

“As you do the turnarounds of The Work, you begin to experience your true nature where you are at peace. Eventually, even that becomes not true. Then you’re left happy for no reason. That’s the end of duality. For me, happiness just is. I can’t even claim it as peace of mind. When we continue to question our thoughts, we’re left with the positive, and there’s nothing we can do about that. It’s the song that matches our true nature.”

The ego is the you that you believe you to be. —Byron Katie

 

For more information, visit thework.com

Podcast: How to Have a Loving Relationship with Your Mom

Also available on iTunes, listen here.

 

 

A woman from New Orleans struggles with her mother’s decision to be friends with a man who has served prison time for rape and who assaulted her when she was a child. Her mother wants to spend time with him because she feels he adds value to her life. “When you are arguing with your mom,” Katie says, “are you adding value to your life or her life? It’s war. Defense is the first act of war. “And in fact, through no choice of your mother’s, the man is no longer in her life. You wanted him out of her life and you have that, but it’s not doing much for you, because you’re feeling betrayed by your mom. He’s fallen out of her life, and you’re still holding onto your resentment. The pain of the past is over, and it appears in the mind as images, as though it were real. This problem has to be kept alive in your mind in order to be a problem. And it’s held at your own expense. “You have to be there at that moment,” Katie says, “in that place, sitting there with your mother when she’s saying she wants him in her life. Identify and collect what you were thinking and believing in that moment. Those beliefs are the ones that caused the feelings of resentment, hatred, rage, and betrayal. When you question these thoughts, you’re questioning the cause of all of those emotions and your separation from your mother. “It’s huge to finally understand not only the cause of all our suffering, but how to identify the specific thought. That’s such a gift.” What I love about the past is: it’s over.

 

Visit thework.com

Purchase, Loving What Is by Byron Katie

Event: 10-13 May 2018 No-Body Intensive

Location: Chicago, Illinois

The No-Body Intensive, Byron Katie’s four-day guided exploration of your belief system, lovingly explores and questions the main aspects of identity. It brings to awareness everything identity is made of. It looks at how we create an identity, what it feels like to carry it, and how we can un-create it.

 

For more information, click here.

Podcast: How to Find Unconditional Love in Your Life

 

To listen to this podcast on iTunes, click here.

 

 

Byron Katie speaks with a woman over Skype whose eldest son died of AIDS 18 years ago. Now she’s dealing with her daughter’s mental illness. She wakes up thinking, “I’ll never see her again.” Katie begins by asking her, “Is it true?”
“As you meditate on a question,” Katie says, “you never know what you’re going to find. Do you see your daughter? Is that an image or is it real? Notice the emotions that happen as you witness these images in your mind—as you sit in a dream that seems so real. Knowing the difference between what’s real and what is not is maturity. It’s like walking out of a movie and noticing that the sun is shining.
When you’re believing that these images are real, it’s so powerful; you can’t see the hand in front of you! You have a picture in your head and then you believe a story onto that picture. You make the image real with your mental soundtrack. So you’re not even connected with your daughter. And that’s why you’re so confused and lost; you’re disconnected from life as it really is.”
“That feels really true,” the woman says. “I’m not waking up thinking about my daughter—I’m waking up and telling myself a story about my daughter.”
“And are you doing that thinking, or is it just happening?” asks Katie.
“It just happens,” says the woman.
“Yes. You’re not doing it. And it’s completely harmless until you believe what you’re thinking,” Katie says. “I meditate on an image as I question what I’m believing about that image. Until I meet everything with unconditional love, my Work’s not done. The only daughter I’ve ever known is the daughter in my mind. When I can’t believe anything negative about her image any longer, then I’m connected with her. I’m fearless.”
The mind is so powerful that it creates your entire world.  —Byron Katie
For more information about The Work, visit thework.com

Event: 4-6 May 2018 Omega Institute

Location: Omega Institue in Rhinebeck, New York

As Katie guides you through The Work, your stressful beliefs—about your past, your family, your relationships, or yourself—can radically shift. In this workshop, working with your thoughts, experiences, and beliefs, using the method that Eckhart Tolle describes as “a great blessing for our planet,” you can discover peaceful, joyful acceptance.

 

For more information about this event, click here.